charlene holy bearArtist Statement:

Historic Native American dolls represent a facet of an era in American history when tribes were either acclimating or resisting the great change to their traditions and culture.

My dolls are expressions of my Lakota identity.

I create dolls that explore and juxtapose the use of traditional and contemporary natural materials such as, wool and wire, sinew and silk thread, porcupine quills and beads, or wood and cellulose clay.

In elevating the approach to Plain’s style traditional doll making, I believe, as an artist of this time, one must explore and acknowledge the fine art aspects of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional design, including form, proportion, gesture, line, and composition.

Education:
Studied fine arts and art history at University of New Mexico (1997-2002) Albuquerque, NM
Worked with a private collection in restoration and taught myself quillwork techniques (8 different techniques) specially Paul Dyck’s.
Early age (5-15) mentored with Rhonda

Experience:
Lakota Doll Artist
1986-present--Great Plains Dolls, Henderson NV

Soft sculpture/figures depicting tribal styles/influences of the Great Plains
Specialization in beadwork and quillwork

Restorer
August 2000-April 2005 Paul Dyck Foundation: Research Institute Of American Indian Culture, Camp Verde, AZ
Museum quality restoration of quillwork and beadwork
Specialization of eight different quillwork techniques

Representation
1999-2002 Morning Star Gallery, Santa Fe NM
1994-1997 Mosi Lakai-Bi’Kisi, Inc, Santa Fe, NM

Biography:
An enrolled member of the Standing Rock Lakota Sioux Tribe, Charlene Holy Bear grew up mostly in northern New Mexico. When she was five years old she created her first doll under the guidance of her older sister Rhonda Holy Bear. A couple of years later, while her sister participated in the 1986 Santa Fe Indian Market, Charlene was encouraged to put a doll in to the youth juried competition and won her first award, a second place ribbon, which allowed her to buy her own filly and related accouterments.

She continued creating dolls while attending high school at the Santa Fe Indian School and participated in a couple of youth artist shows, in a local gallery, Mosi Lakai-Bi’kisi. Later, with her sister, she had dolls exhibited at the Morning Star Gallery, Santa Fe, NM while attending the University of New Mexico where she studied fine arts and art history.

Since then, she has used that background to create historically based interpretations of dolls that explore various concepts of Native American life.

Awards/Honors
August 1986--2nd place, Youth Category, SWAIA, Santa Fe, NM
March 2006--Honorable Mention, Christina Burke, Classification VII-E-Diverse Arts-Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market, Phoenix, AZ
March 2007--Judges Choice, Ruth Schultz, Classification VII-C-Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market, Phoenix, AZ
March 2007--2nd Place, Classification VII-C Diverse Arts-Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market, Phoenix, AZ
August 2007--1st place, Plains Style Dolls/Figures/Soft Sculptures, SWAIA, Santa Fe NM
August 2007--Best of Division B, Classification VIII, SWAIA, Santa Fe, NM
March 2008--2nd Place, Best of Division-C Diverse Arts-Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market, Phoenix, AZ
August 2008--2nd Place, Plains Style Dolls/Figures/Soft Sculptures, SWAIA, Santa Fe, NM
March 2009--Judges Choice, James T. Bialac Classification VII-C, Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market, Phoenix, AZ
March 2010--2nd Place, Best of Division-C Diverse Arts-Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market, Phoenix, AZ
2008 SWAIA Fellowship recipient

Previous exhibits/galleries
1994--4th Annual Young Artists’ Show, Mosi Lakai-Bi’Kisi, Inc. Santa Fe, NM
1995--5th Annual Young Artists’ Show, Mosi Lakai-Bi’Kisi, Inc. Santa Fe, NM
Morning Star Gallery, Santa Fe, NM

Collections:
Foundation for the Preservation of American Indian Arts and Cultures, Inc. (Saint Augustine’s Indian Center), Father Peter Powell, Chicago, ILL

National Museum of the American Indian, Washington DC

Mitchell Museum, Chicago, ILL